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Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana
Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana
Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana
Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana
Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana
Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana

Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana

Regular price $375.00 Sale

Antique African Food Bowl, Turkana This primitive tribal food bowl has aged beautifully through its lifetime by use and exposure, and will bring a sense of history and authenticity into your home. The repairs embrace the spirit of wabi-sabi making it even more beautiful.

On it's own it is a beautiful Object d' Art but also wonderful filled with shells or any collection. Shown filled with our Murex Indivia Longspine Shells.

*note all marks and wear are inherent qualities of an authentic vintage item and are not damages.

Please view all photos for condition, as our opinion may differ from yours.

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DIMENSIONS: 15" L x 7" W x 3" H

ORIGINS: Turkana, Kenya

CIRCA: Late 19th - Early 20th Century

MATERIALS: Wood

FACTS & HISTORY: The Turkana are noted for raising camels and weaving baskets. In their oral traditions, they designate themselves the people of the grey bull , after the Zebu, the domestication of which played an important role in their history.

In recent years, development aid programs have aimed at introducing fishing among the Turkana (a taboo in some sections of The Turkana society) with very limited success. Livestock is an important aspect of Turkana culture. Goats, camels, donkeys and zebu are the primary herd stock utilized by the Turkana people.

In this society, livestock functions not only as a milk and meat producer, but as form of currency used for bride-price negotiations and dowries. Often, a young man will be given a single goat with which to start a herd, and he will accumulate more via animal husbandry. In turn, once he has accumulated sufficient livestock, these animals will be used to negotiate for wives. It is not uncommon for Turkana men to lead polygynous lifestyles, since livestock wealth will determine the number of wives each can negotiate for and support.