Join LUXE CURATIONS for an Instagram Live this Thursday 6pm for Chinoiserie Pumpkin DIY Tutorial & GIVEAWAY

Pair of Liberian Dan Passport Mask, Early 20th Century
Pair of Liberian Dan Passport Mask, Early 20th Century
Pair of Liberian Dan Passport Mask, Early 20th Century
Pair of Liberian Dan Passport Mask, Early 20th Century

Pair of Liberian Dan Passport Mask, Early 20th Century

Regular price $125.00 Sale

Pair of Liberian Dan Masks, Carved from a single piece of soft wood, this oval face mask by a Dan carver of Côte d'Ivoire or Liberia. this is one of a kind, dramatic and beautiful vintage African Mask from Liberia.

Wonderful addition to any collection, we could imagine displaying them in your library or gallery.

• Please view all photos for condition, as our opinion may differ from yours.

• Please see our shop policies on returns, exchanges & shipping.

• Please pay close attention to item descriptions  and if you have questions about a selection, PLEASE message us & we will be glad to help!

Please visit our online shop www.luxecurations.com for more exciting new, vintage and antique decor and accessories!

DIMENSIONS: 5" L x 2" W x 2" D & 4" L x 2" W x 1.5" D

MATERIALS: Hand Carved Wood *note all marks and wear are inherent qualities of an authentic vintage item and are not damages.

ORIGIN: Liberia, Early 20th Century, exact age unknown 

FACTS & HISTORY: The border between Cote d'Ivoire and Liberia cuts across several ethnic groups, including the Dan, Wee, Kran, and Grebo. In Dan society, dangerous immaterial forest spirits are translated into the forms of human face masks. Whether or not they are worn, such sculptures are spiritually charged. Male performers, gle-zo, experience a dream sent by the mask spirit that allows them to dance it. In performance, the masks are integrated into the hierarchical system that governs political and religious life.

Dan masks have been documented as the embodiment of at least a dozen artistic personalities. Among these are Deangle, who ventures into the village from the initiation camps to ask women for food; Tankagle and Bagle, who entertain through a range of aesthetically pleasing dances, skits, and mimes; Bugle, who historically leads men into battle; and Gunyege, whose mask is worn by a community's champion foot racers in competitions. The present example might be identified as Gunyege; once they are divorced from their performance contexts, however, mask forms are difficult to identify.