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Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot
Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot
Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot
Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot
Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot
Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot
Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot

Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Scholar's Calligraphy Brush Pot

Regular price $150.00 Sale

Antique Blue & White Chinoiserie Calligraphy Brush Pot is such a special acquisition. Chinese scholar’s objects were, in a sense, the luxury goods of their time, but rather than wealth what they really represented was the physical embodiment of the scholar’s intellectual curiosity and aesthetic taste. Rich in history they are also functional and beautiful additions to any collection. Use as bud vase, pencil cup, chop stick holder or on your vanity as a make up brush holder.

DIMENSIONS: 4" h x 2 1/2" diameter

CIRCA: Antique porcelain, exact age unknown, bears the Artemisia leaf mark of the Kanxi 1662-1722 

FACTS & HISTORY: The Four Treasures of the Scholar Also known as the four jewels of the study are Brush, Ink, Paper, Inkstone. The individual treasures have a "treasured" form, each being produced in certain areas of China as a specialty for those scholars who would use them. Classical scholars had more than just the Four treasures in their studies. The other "Treasures" include the brush-holder (笔架), brush-hanger (笔挂), paperweights (镇纸), the brush-rinsing pot (笔洗), and the seal (圖章) and seal-ink (印泥).

The brush is the oldest Four Treasures member, with archaeological evidence dating to Zhou dynasty (1045 BC–256 BC). In the Han dynasty (202 BC–220 AD) the writing brush entered a new stage of development. Which created the decorative craft of engraving and inlaying. Brushes were made from animal hair, or —in certain situations—the first hair taken from a baby's head (said to bring good luck in the Imperial examinations).