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Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase
Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase
Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase
Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase
Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase
Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase
Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase

Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase

Regular price $165.00 Sale

Chinese Qing Dynasty Carved Soapstone Sunflower Vase Intricately carved vase with flower leaves and bud detail. In very good antique condition.

Very beautiful piece to be apprieciated and added to any Chinoiserie Collection.

Please view all photos for condition, as our opinion may differ from yours. 

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DIMENSIONS: 6" H x 3" W x 2" D

MATERIALS: SOAPSTONE

CIRCA: 1900's. 20th Century

ORIGIN: China

FACTS & HISTORY: The oldest identifiable Chinese soapstone sculptures are dated to more than 3000 years ago. Soapstone color’s range from white, black, grey, purple, pink, greens, red and brown. It is a soft high talc content stone and can easily be scratched with a knife blade or even your fingernail. Soapstone was used for the carving of many subjects, from Buddha to Zhong Kui. It is a very versatile stone.

Stones from Qingtian, currently Zhejiang province are called Qingtian stone. Carvings of the stone originated in the Kanze period of 5000 years ago. Historic Qingtian stone carvings has been unearthed in a tomb of the southern and northern dynasties period (420-581). By the time of the Song dynasty (960-1279) artists had made use of the moderate hardness of the stone with its colors and texture to bring in the multi-layer carving techniques.

The Ming dynasty (1368 – 1644) saw the height of soapstone production in China. Soapstone was not only used for art it was also used to make dishes, utensils, plates, teapots and boxes.