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Blue Willow Platter
Blue Willow Platter
Blue Willow Platter
Blue Willow Platter

Blue Willow Platter

Regular price $95.00 Sale

Blue Willow Platter large platter in very good vintage condition- no visible imperfections.  It's a very pretty and collectible addition to your tableware collection. Purchased from an Estate Sale of one of Kennebunk, Maine storied Summer Street Mansions.

A featured item from our Kennebunkport Collection.  One-of-a-kind unique items sourced from the Kennebunk’s in southern Coastal Maine. Bring an authentic piece of nautical or coastal Maine history into your home.

Please view all photos for condition, as our opinion may differ from yours. 

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DIMENSIONS: 3" H x 14" W x 18.5" L

ORIGIN: marked Heritage Mint

ERA: 1982

FACTS & HISTORYThe Blue Willow pattern is English, although it is based on similar blue landscape designs in Chinese porcelain. By the end of the 18th century, several English potteries were making Blue Willow patterns, and it immediately captivated the imaginations of consumers. Potteries continued to make Blue Willow throughout the 19th century and 20th century, and it is still made today. Most Blue Willow made in Japan in the 1920's-1940's. Part of what makes Blue Willow so popular is the story it tells in its design.

The Legend of the Blue Willow 

Long ago, in the days when China was ruled by emperors, a Chinese mandarin, Tso Ling, lived in the magnificent pagoda under the branches of the apple tree on the right of the bridge, over which droops the famous willow tree, and in front of which is seen the graceful lines of the fence. Tso Ling was the father of a beautiful girl, Kwang-se, who was the promised bride of an old but wealthy merchant. The girl, however, fell in love with Chang, her father's clerk. The lovers eloped across the sea to the cottage on the island. The mandarin pursued and caught the lovers and was about to have them killed when the gods transformed them into a pair of turtle doves. These are the doves seen gazing into each other's eyes at the top of the design on the plates