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Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra
Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra
Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra
Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra
Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra
Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra
Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra

Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra

Regular price $65.00 Sale

Tingsha Ritual Cymbals with Syllable Mantra, hand cast and vary slightly in size, weight, and style. They have been carefully selected and matched in pairs to ensure sweet clear heavenly sounds.

These tingsha carry the Ashtamangala, or Eight Auspicious Symbols, in an unending procession. You will see these symbols often repeated in Tibetan work. They bring good fortune to aid your growth of spirituality, wisdom and understanding, and all of the other virtues you need to open the way to enlightenment. 

In excellent vintage condition. Shows desirable age and natural wear due to use.

Please view all photos for condition, as our opinion may differ from yours. 

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Please pay close attention to item descriptions  and if you have questions about a selection, PLEASE message us & we will be glad to help!  

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DIMENSIONS: 6.5" H x 6" W x 1" D, set of 2

MATERIALS: Brass and Leather

ORIGIN: Thibet

CIRCA: 20th Century

FACTS & HISTORY: Tingsha are small, heavy cymbals joined together by a leather strap, they are traditionally used in prayer and rituals by Tibetan Buddhist practitioners. Struck gently together they produce a clear, high pitched tone that is ideal for mediation, relaxation, and cleansing and protection in your meditation place.

Typical sizes range from 2.5–4 inches in diameter. Tingsha are very thick and produce a unique long ringing tone. Antique tingsha were made from special bronze alloys that produce harmonic overtones.

Today, tingsha are used along with singing bowls and other instruments in meditation, music and sound healing. Artists use multiple pairs of antique tingsha together to create a sonic tapestry effect.

Traditionally, however, tingsha are used as part of specific Tibetan rituals, such as offerings to "hungry ghosts." While they are commonly found today in musical recordings and yoga classes, their real function is as a religious ritual tool. 

Hungry ghost is a concept in Buddhism, and Chinese traditional religion, representing beings who are driven by intense emotional needs in an animalistic way.  "Hungry ghosts" play a role in Chinese Buddhism and Taoism as well as in Chinese folk religion The term is not to be confused with the generic term for "ghost" or damnation, guǐ (i.e. the residual spirit of a deceased ancestor). The understanding is that all people become such a regular ghost when they die and would then slowly weaken and eventually die a second time.